Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS): Infectious Causes

Despite a vigorous search, scientists have not yet identified what causes CFS. While a single cause for CFS may yet be identified, another possibility is that CFS has multiple causes. Conditions that have been studied to determine if they cause or trigger the development of CFS include infections, immune disorders, stress, trauma, and toxins.

Infection

Various types of infections have been studied to determine if they might cause or trigger CFS:

  • Epstein-Barr virus infection, also known as mononucleosis
  • Human herpesvirus 6 infection, a virus that can cause problems for people with impaired immune systems, such as AIDS patients or organ transplant recipients taking immune-suppressant drugs
  • Enterovirus infection, a type of virus that enters through the gastrointestinal track and can have no symptoms, mild flu-like symptoms, or rarely severe and even deadly symptoms
  • Rubella, a viral infection also known as German measles
  • Candida albicans, a fungus that causes yeast infections
  • Bornaviruses, which cause borna disease, an infectious neurological syndrome
  • Mycoplasma, a cause of atypical pneumonia
  • Ross River virus, which causes Ross River Fever, a mosquito-borne tropical disease
  • Coxiella burnetti, the agent that causes Q fever
  • Human retrovirus infection, such as HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, or xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV), a gammaretrovirus

The cause of CFS is unknown, but the condition may be related to infection with effects on the immune system. Several viruses have been studied as possible causes of CFS, but no cause-and-effect relationship has been discovered.

Yeast Overgrowth

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A yeast (fungus) called Candida albicans lives in your gastrointestinal tract. That’s normal and not a problem — until there’s too much of it, which then becomes a condition called “yeast overgrowth.”  When there is an overgrowth of billions of unnecessary yeast, your gastrointestinal tract turns into a churning fermentation tank. These yeast also weaken the immune system.  Yeast overgrowth is common and can be a contributing cause or result of chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia.

Normal bowel microflora, such as Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria species, support healthy gastrointestinal function through numerous mechanisms. These probiotic bacteria contribute to a healthy intestinal environment by helping maintain an optimal pH and producing important nutrients and enzymes. However, everyday factors such as poor diet, stress, and travel can disrupt healthy intestinal microflora, contributing to yeast overgrowth. Probiotic Pearls were developed by Integrative Therapeutics to help maintain a healthy balance of beneficial bacteria the body needs, supporting digestive function, and providing immune support.

In order for a probiotic supplement to be truly effective in the body, it must utilize a delivery form that protects the live, active cultures from a wide array of damaging, ever-present environmental factors. Probiotic Pearls accomplish this with a novel encapsulating process, known as True Delivery Technology. This patented, triple-layer coating system results in a convenient, one-of-a-kind delivery form that protects the vulnerable probiotics within from heat, moisture, oxygen, and stomach acid. True Delivery Technology guarantees that active cultures survive stomach acid, arrive in the intestines, and remain alive for exceptional support.

Take one capsule daily, with water or your favorite beverage. May be taken with or without food. Do not chew or crush.  When taken daily, Probiotic Pearls promote digestive renewal.  They combat yeast overgrowth and optimize and nourish your immune system, which in turn, prevents, reduces, and/or reverses chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia.

Virus Linked to Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

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Scientists have discovered a potential retroviral link to chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), a debilitating disease that is estimated to affect upwards of 17 million people worldwide.  Judy Mikovits, from the Whittemore Peterson Institute at University of Nevada-Reno (USA), and colleagues identified a newly identified retrovirus, XMRV, in the blood of 67% of CFS patients (as compared to 3.7% of healthy people participating in the study).  Not only did the blood cells of CFS patients contain XMRV, but they also expressed XMRV proteins at high levels and produced infectious viral particles. The XMRV retrovirus was first discovered in men who had a specific immune system defect that reduced their ability to fight viral infections, and has since been suggested to be a potential trigger of prostate cancer.  While this finding shows there is an association between XMRV and CFS, it does not prove that XMRV causes CFS.  Yet, the team observes that: “We now have evidence that a retrovirus named XMRV is frequently present in the blood of patients with CFS. This discovery could be a major step in the discovery of vital treatment options for millions of patients.”

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